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Tag Archives | pide

Turkish Flat breads with Cheese, Tomato and Egg; Yumurtali Pide

Turkish flatbreads with cheese, tomato, pepper with a cracked egg; Yumurtali, Peynirli Pide

Turkish flatbreads with cheese, tomato, pepper with a cracked egg; Yumurtali, Peynirli Pide

Merhaba all; Pide, Turkish oval flat breads, are much loved at home; they are the ultimate snack and our “to go” food, our version of “Pizza”. Many of you kindly expressed that you enjoyed my Pide with Spinach, Peppers and Feta as well as Pide with Ground Meat and Vegetables with recipes here and asked for variations. Hence comes this new Pide recipe with cheese, tomato with a cracked egg in the middle, Yumurtali Pide.

This pide hails from the Kayseri region in Middle Anatolia, where locals would also use region’s wonderful delicacy, Pastirma – dried cured and thinly sliced beef over the topping. An egg would be cracked in the middle of each pide at the last 4-5 minutes of baking and then baked further until the egg is just set, delicious. I used medium cheddar cheese (kasar as we call it in Turkish) along with grated mozzarella at the topping, they worked well. The addition of warm milk at this dough made the crust slightly softer with still a nice texture to it.

Pide, Turkish flay bread with cheese, pepper, tomato with a cracked egg, Kayseri Style

Pide, Turkish flat bread with cheese, pepper, tomato with a cracked egg, Kayseri Style

I hope you enjoy this delicious, easy to make Yumurtali Pide; you can alter the topping and add on your choice of cheese or slices of dried cured beef or pastrami too.  This wonderful Pide would also go down very well for Turkish style breakfast or brunch.

Afiyet Olsun,

Ozlem

5.0 from 5 reviews
Turkish Flat breads with Cheese, Tomato and Egg; Yumurtali Pide
 
This pide hails from the Kayseri region in Middle Anatolia, where locals would also use region’s wonderful delicacy, Pastirma – dried cured and thinly sliced beef over the topping. An egg is cracked in the middle of each pide at the last 4-5 minutes of baking and then baked further until the egg is just set, delicious. I hope you enjoy this delicious, easy to make Yumurtali Pide; you can alter the topping and add on your choice of cheese or slices of dried cured beef or pastrami too. This wonderful Pide would also go down very well for Turkish style breakfast or brunch.
Author:
Recipe type: Turkish Flat Breads with Topping, Pide
Cuisine: Turkish Cuisine
Serves: 8
Ingredients
  • • For the dough:
  • • 300 gr/ 10oz/2 ½ cups all-purpose plain flour
  • • 7gr dried yeast
  • • 5 ml/ 1 tsp. sugar
  • • 5 ml / 1 tsp. salt
  • • 4 fl. oz./112 ml/1/2 cup warm water
  • • 2 ½ fl oz. / 70 ml / ⅓ cup warm milk
  • • 45ml/3 tbsp. olive oil
  • • 1 egg + 5 ml/ 1 tsp. olive oil to brush the pide
  • • For the topping:
  • • 60 gr / 2 oz. medium cheddar cheese, thinly sliced
  • • 110 gr/ 4 oz. grated mozzarella
  • • ½ medium tomato, deseeded and thinly sliced
  • • ¼ green bell pepper, cut in half and thinly sliced
  • • 2 eggs (one egg for each pide) to crack over pide topping
  • • Red pepper flakes / Turkish pul biber to sprinkle over the egg
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 180 C/ 350 F
  2. Stir in the dried yeast and sugar in a small bowl and pour in ½ cup warm water. Dissolve and mix the yeast in water. Set aside for the yeast mixture to get frothy for 5 minutes.
  3. Combine the flour and salt in a large bowl. Make a well in the middle and pour in 2 tbsp. olive oil and the yeast mixture. Also stir in the warm milk to the flour mixture. Using your hands, draw in the flour from the sides and work the mixture into a dough. On a floured surface, knead for 3 -5 minutes, until you reach a soft, smooth dough. The dough may get sticky as you knead, so pour the remaining 1 tbsp. olive oil and add a little more flour if needed to help shape into a soft dough.
  4. Grease a large bowl with a little olive oil, place the dough and cover with a cling film. Leave the dough in a warm place for 1 hour to rise.
  5. Once the dough is risen, place the dough on a lightly floured surface. Knead the dough for a minute then divide the dough into two pieces and roll into two balls. On a lightly floured surface, roll the dough balls into 2 oval shapes of 20 cm x 40 cm (about 8”x16”), with ½ cm (0.2”) thickness.
  6. Line a large baking tray with baking paper and place the 2 oval flat bread dough on the tray.
  7. Spread the grated mozzarella cheese, cheddar cheese, sliced peppers and tomatoes evenly over the 2 flat breads, leaving 2 cm at the edges as a border with no filling (I’ve found it’s easier to spread the filling while the oval dough is in the tray). Fold in the sides to act as border to keep the filling intact. Squeeze the oval dough at each end to make it pointy.
  8. Beat an egg in a small bowl and mix it with 1 tsp. olive oil. Brush the edges of dough with this mixture. Bake for 18 minutes, until the pides golden and crispy at the edges.
  9. Take the pide tray out of the oven and carefully crack an egg in the middle of each pide. Return to the oven and bake for another 4-5 minutes; take care not to overcook the egg; it should be just set with the yolk still runny.
  10. Sprinkle red pepper flakes, Turkish pul biber over the egg, cut in slices and serve while warm.
Ozlem’s Turkish Table at the Cactus Kitchens – Michel Roux Jr Cookery School and at the Blid & Hatton Gatherings

My Turkish cookery workshop and exploring flavors at the Cactus Kitchens - Michel Roux Jr Cookery School

My Turkish cookery workshop and exploring flavors at the Cactus Kitchens – Michel Roux Jr Cookery School

Fabulous Pide with feta, peppers and spinach made by the participants

Fabulous Pide with feta, peppers and spinach made by the participants

It’s been an exciting and busy few weeks with some Food Consultancy and teaching Turkish Cookery to enthusiastic participants. It was a privilege to teach at the stunning Cactus Kitchens – Michel Roux Jr Cookery School. We not only made Pide, Ezme, Kisir and many more with the participants, we also explored creative use of spices, talked about current food trends and carried out innovative food workshops to explore exciting flavors – a very inspirational and enjoyable day.

Our Turkish Cookery Workshop at the Medicine Garden, Cobham - Surrey

Our Turkish Cookery Workshop at the Medicine Garden, Cobham – Surrey

Another very enjoyable Turkish cookery class, with recipes including the much loved Stuffed aubergines/eggplants with ground meat and vegetables, Karniyarik. This time teaching locally at the beautiful Blid & Hatton Gatherings in Cobham, Surrey – England. I love how love of food brings us all together and grateful for the food lovers keen to explore new, delicious flavors. More classes to come in Autumn!

Making Karniyarik, Stuffed Aubergines together

Making Karniyarik, Stuffed Aubergines together

Spinach and feta filo pie, Ispanakli Borek is ready!

Spinach and feta filo pie, Ispanakli Borek is ready!

Karniyarik, Stuffed Aubergines were a big hit as always!

Karniyarik, Stuffed Aubergines were a big hit as always!

Delicious finish with Turkish Coffee

Delicious finish with Turkish Coffee

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Home made Turkish Pide Bread; Pide Ekmek

Home made Turkish round flat bread, Pide Ekmek

Home made Turkish round flat bread, Pide Ekmek

Firin, bakery in Long Market, Uzun Carsi; fond memories of getting our daily bread from there.

Firin, bakery in Long Market, Uzun Carsi; fond memories of getting our daily bread from there.

Bread, ekmek is a major staple in Turkish cuisine and appears generously at breakfast, lunch and dinner. Bread is treated with high respect and rarely wasted at home; stale bread is used in spreads like in this Walnuts and red pepper paste dip, Muhammara – Cevizli Biber, in soups as well as in puddings. Traditional oval or round pide bread, Ekmek, is a national favorite, traditionally cooked in hot clay oven. Pide bread is also a must in Turkish tables and highly consumed during the Ramadan period to break the fast. I have lots of fond childhood memories of strolling through Uzun Carsi, Long Market in Antakya to pick up the freshly baked bread and how delicious it was. Grandma would always order a spare one as she knew we had a soft spot for pide bread and half would be gone on the way home – just irresistible.

Stretch the dough into large, uneven rounds and indent the dough with your fingertips.

Stretch the dough into large, uneven rounds and indent the dough with your fingertips.

This version of pide (recipe adapted from Ghillie Basan’s Classic Turkish Cookery book) has a crispy crust but soft in texture, great to serve with mezzes and mop up the delicious juices of the casseroles and indispensable at Turkish Breakfast. Important tip: To keep the pides soft and warm, place a dry towel over them when fresh out of the oven. You can also reheat them before eating; just sprinkle them with water and place in a hot oven (180 C/ 350 F) for a few minutes.

Turkish pide bread, pide ekmek

Turkish pide bread, pide ekmek, straight from the oven

Pide bread and many more Turkish pastries and specialties are included at my cookery book, Ozlem’s Turkish Table, Recipes from My Homeland, available to order at this link with a prompt delivery, if you’d like to get it.

Ozlem’s Turkish Table Cookery Book, available to order at this link

Afiyet Olsun,

Ozlem

5.0 from 4 reviews
Home made Turkish Pide Bread; Pide Ekmek
 
Bread, ekmek is a major staple in Turkish cuisine and appears generously at breakfast, lunch and dinner. This Turkish pide bread is delicious and easy to make at home. Pide is great to serve with mezzes and dips or mop up the delicious juices of casseroles and stews. This recipe is adapted from Ghillie Basan’s Classic Turkish Cookery book. Makes 2 medium sized Pide.
Author:
Recipe type: Turkish Flat Breads
Cuisine: Turkish Cuisine
Serves: 8 - 10
Ingredients
  • 1 lb. / 450 gr all-purpose plain flour
  • ¼ oz. 7 gr dried yeast or ½ oz. / 15 gr fresh yeast
  • ½ tsp. sugar
  • 6 fl. oz. / 175 ml lukewarm water
  • 5 ml/ 1 tsp. salt
  • 30 ml/ 2 tbsp. thick yoghurt
  • 30 ml/ 2 tbsp. olive oil
  • 1 egg, beaten
  • 30 ml / 2 tbsp. nigella seeds or poppy seeds
  • 30 ml / 2 tbsp. sesame seeds
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 400 F / 200 C
  2. Cream the yeast with sugar in half of the lukewarm water, leave to froth.
  3. Sift the flour with the salt. Make a well in the middle and pour in the yeast, olive oil, yoghurt and the rest of the water. With using your hands, draw in the flour from the sides and work the mixture into a sticky dough. Add a little more water if necessary. Knead until the dough is smooth and leaves the sides of the bowl (drizzle a little oil in your hands to help shape the dough, if needed too).
  4. Continue to knead on a lightly floured surface until the dough is elastic and smooth. Roll it in the few drops of olive oil in the bowl, cover with a damp towel and leave to prove in a warm place for 1- 1 ½ hours or until doubled in size.
  5. Preheat 2 baking sheets.
  6. Once doubled, punch the dough down, knead again and divide it into two pieces. Knead each piece well. Flatten them out with the heel of your hand and stretch them into large, uneven rounds or ovals, creating thick lip around the edges. Indent the dough with your fingertips.
  7. Lightly oil two hot baking sheets and place them in the oven for 2 minutes. Place the pide on them and brush the pides with the beaten egg. Then sprinkle the nigella (or poppy) seeds and sesame seeds over the top.
  8. Bake the pides for 18 – 20 minutes, until lightly golden with a crisp crust around the edges. Transfer them to a wire rack. If you want them to retain their softness, wrap them in aluminum foil or in a dry towel while still warm.
Notes
To keep the pides soft and warm, place a dry towel over them when fresh out of the oven. You can also reheat them before eating; just sprinkle them with water and place in a hot oven (180 C/ 350 F) for a few minutes.
 

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Kiymali Pide; Turkish Flat bread with ground meat and vegetables

Kiymali Pide, Turkish oval flat breads with ground meat, onion, tomato and peppers

Kiymali Pide, Turkish oval flat breads with ground meat, onion, tomato and peppers

This Kiymali Pide, Turkish flat bread with ground meat and vegetables filling, is one of the most popular snacks and our slow cooked “fast food” in Turkey. In Rural Anatolia and at my home town Antakya, locals would prepare the filling and take it to their local bakery, firin, to be baked into delicious flatbreads with this topping over. There are also “Pideci” Turkish flat bread shops that solely bake and serve these flat breads along with piyaz or Coban Salata, Shepherd’s Salad; such delicious flavor combinations.

Traditional bakery, firin in Antakya. Bakers not only bake the bread but also flat breads with toppings that customers would bring.

Traditional bakery, firin in Antakya. Bakers not only bake the bread but also flat breads with toppings that customers would bring.

I am often asked the difference between pide and lahmacun, another national favorite. Lahmacun is also a flat bread with ground meat topping, but it is thinner and in round shape. We like to squeeze lemon over it liberally and roll it like a wrap to eat lahmacun. Pide is oval in shape, thicker and we serve in slices.

Shaping the flat breads; it is easier to spread the filling while the oval flat bread is on the tray.

Shaping the flat breads; it is easier to spread the filling while the oval flat bread is on the tray.

Pide can also be made in various toppings; some favorite toppings are ground meat & onion, Turkish kasar (cheddar) cheese & spinach, cheese and pastrami (Turkish dried beef), cheese and Turkish spicy sauage (sucuk). Sometimes an egg or two can be cracked over pide towards the end of baking too, as in some examples of Karadeniz Pidesi a specialty of a pide prepared in Black Sea region.

Kiymali Pide, Turkish flat breads with meat and vegetables topping, freshly baked

Kiymali Pide, Turkish flat breads with meat and vegetables topping, freshly baked

Making pide is actually much easier than you think – we made it at my recent Turkish cookery class and it was a big hit. I hope you enjoy this delicious Turkish specialty, our version of pizza, packed with flavor and have a chance to recreate at home.

Signed copies of Ozlem’s Turkish Table book, available to order at this link

Both vegetarian pide and with minced/ground meat topping are included at my Turkish cookery book, Ozlem’s Turkish Table, Recipes from My Homeland, available to order at this link.

Kiymali Pide, sliced Turkish flat breads with ground meat topping, ready to serve.

Kiymali Pide, sliced Turkish flat breads with ground meat topping, ready to serve.

Afiyet Olsun,

Ozlem

5.0 from 6 reviews
Kiymali Pide; Turkish Flat bread with meat, onion and peppers
 
This Kiymali Pide, Turkish flat bread with ground meat and vegetables topping, is one of the most popular snacks and our slow cooked “fast food” in Turkey. In Rural Anatolia and at my home town Antakya, locals would prepare the filling and take it to their local bakery, firin, to be baked as these delicious flat breads with toppings. There are also “Pideci” Turkish flat bread shops that solely bake and serve these flat breads. I hope you enjoy this delicious Turkish specialty, our version of pizza, packed with flavor and have a chance to recreate at home.
Author:
Recipe type: Turkish flat breads with ground meat and vegetable topping; Kiymali Pide
Cuisine: Turkish Cuisine
Serves: 6
Ingredients
  • For the dough:
  • 300 gr/ 10½ oz. / + 2 tbsp. all-purpose plain flour
  • 5ml/1 tsp. salt
  • 14 gr/4 tsp. dried yeast (2 packs of 7gr dried yeast)
  • 8 fl. oz. /1 cup warm water
  • 45ml/3 tbsp. olive oil
  • For the topping:
  • 1 medium onion, finely chopped
  • 400 gr/14 oz. ground beef or ground lamb or mixture
  • ½ green bell pepper or 1 green pointy pepper, finely diced
  • 2 medium tomatoes, deseeded and diced
  • 15 ml/ 1 tbsp. lemon juice
  • 15 ml/ 1 tbsp. olive oil
  • Salt (5 ml/1 tsp. salt is recommended) and freshly ground black pepper to taste
  • 1 egg + 15 ml/ 1 tbsp. olive oil to brush the pide
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 180 C/ 350 F
  2. Stir in the dried yeast in a small bowl and pour in ½ cup warm water. Dissolve the yeast in water, mixing with your fingers. Set aside for the yeast mixture to get frothy for 5 minutes.
  3. Combine the flour and salt in a large bowl.
  4. Make a well in the middle and pour in 2 tbsp. olive oil and the yeast mixture.
  5. Pour in the remaining ½ warm water to the flour mixture. Using your hands, draw in the flour from the sides and work the mixture into a dough.
  6. Knead for 3 -5 minutes, until you reach a soft, smooth dough. The dough gets sticky as you knead, so pour the remaining 1 tbsp. olive oil and stir in additional 2 tbsp. flour to help shape into a soft dough.
  7. Place the dough in large bowl and cover with a cling film. Leave it in a warm place for 1 hour; it will be doubled in size.
  8. In the meantime, prepare your filling. Heat 15ml/1tbsp. olive oil in a wide heavy pan and stir in the onions and peppers.
  9. Sauté the onions and peppers for 2-3 minutes over medium heat, until they start to soften. Stir in the tomatoes and sauté for another 2 minutes. Pour in the lemon juice and season with salt and ground black pepper. Turn the heat off.
  10. Place the ground meat in a bowl and combine the cooked vegetables with the ground meat, mix well. The topping is ready.
  11. Once the dough is risen, place the dough on a lightly floured surface. Knead the dough for a minute then divide the dough into two pieces and roll into two balls.
  12. On a lightly floured surface, roll the dough balls into 2 oval shapes of 20 cm x 40 cm (about 8”x16”), with ½ cm (0.2”) thickness.
  13. Line a large baking tray with baking paper and place the 2 oval flat bread dough on the tray.
  14. Spread the filling evenly over the 2 flat breads, leaving 2 cm at the edges as a border with no filling (it is easier to spread the filling while the oval flat bread is in the tray).
  15. Fold in the sides to act as border to keep the filling intact. Squeeze the oval dough at each end to make it pointy.
  16. Beat an egg in a small bowl and mix it with 1 tbsp. olive oil. Brush the edges of dough with this mixture.
  17. Bake for 25 - 30 minutes, until the pides are golden brown and crispy at the edges.
  18. Once cool, cut into slices and serve.
 

 

 

 

 

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